Articles By: Richard K

The Age of Outrage

‘What’s worse,’ asked the comedian, ‘leaving a swearword on somebody’s answer-phone or tacitly supporting Adolph Hitler when he took charge of the Third Reich?’ Russell Brand was speaking on his radio show on 25 October 2008 – a week after he and Jonathan Ross had left a series of lewd messages on the answering machine of ‘Manuel’ actor Andrew Sachs. […]

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The Flame of Power

For Plato, the ideal city-state was one in which ‘philosopher-kings’ would take charge; ‘Unless philosophers bear kingly rule in cities,’ he has Socrates say in The Republic, ‘there will be no respite from evil.’ In reality, however, the history of intellectuals in power has not been a happy one; indeed, it seems that theoretical acumen and practical ability are often […]

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For the love of sharks

On the morning of 6 November 2000, Ken Crew was finishing his regular swim off the popular, and usually placid, beach of North Cottesloe, a 500-metre stretch of sand in a well-to-do western suburb of Perth. It was around 6.30, and the 49-year-old Crew, a businessman and father of three, was wading in waist-deep water, when a 5-metre great white […]

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Philip Dodd and I go head to head

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On Geoffrey Robertson and Michael Kirby

‘Although an expatriate, I am not an ex-patriot’, writes the human rights barrister Geoffrey Robertson in his introduction to Dreaming Too Loud, a collection of essays spanning thirty years and touching on subjects as diverse as drones, Lady Chatterley’s Lover and Julian Assange. It’s a point on which he insists more than once, perhaps because, as well as living in […]

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A dangerous cynicism

It is now almost exactly a quarter of a century since history – or rather History – ended. The year was 1989. Amidst the collapsing scenery of the Soviet Union and its European satellites, a political scientist called Francis Fukuyama stepped forward to declare that liberal democracy was now the only game in town. His essay ‘The End of History?’ […]

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On David Whish-Wilson’s Perth

The object of travel, wrote G. K. Chesterton, ‘is not to set foot on foreign land; it is at last to set foot on one’s own country as a foreign land’. David Whish-Wilson returned to his own country, Australia, at the age of twenty-nine, having spent a decade ‘bumming around’ in Europe, Asia and Africa. I’ve no doubt he could […]

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Talking about offence with the ABC’s Richard Fidler

http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/local/brisbane/conversations/201311/r1203534_15602380.mp3

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Would You Kill the Fat Man?

Consider the following scenario. Terrorists have hijacked three passenger aeroplanes, two of which have just been flown into skyscrapers in the middle of a busy city. On its first run, the third plane missed its target, but it is now lining up for another attempt. In the meantime, you – the head of the Air Force – have been able […]

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On John Kinsella’s Tide

John Kinsella’s new collection of short stories, Tide, begins with an acknowledgement of ‘the traditional owners and custodians of the land he [i.e. the author] writes’. Certainly Kinsella’s work can feel like part of the Australian landscape; with over thirty collections of poetry to his name, and many works of prose besides, the Perth-born writer is nothing if not conspicuous. […]

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