Category: Society

Brave New Wild: Why ‘Resurrecting’ the Thylacine is a Dangerous Idea

Brave New Wild: Why ‘Resurrecting’ the Thylacine is a Dangerous Idea

In 2021 the National Film and Sound Archive released new footage of the last known thylacine, or Tasmanian tiger.

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Zero Gravity: Floating Towards Posthumanism

Zero Gravity: Floating Towards Posthumanism

‘They say it got smart, a new order of intelligence’, rasps Kyle Reese in The Terminator, referring to the Skynet computer system that launched a nuclear attack against humanity in the catastrophe known as Judgment Day. The trope is as old as science fiction itself, and shadows the genre with all of the tenacity of an Uzi-toting T-800.

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Review of Who’s Black and Why?

Review of Who’s Black and Why?

In 1741, the exalted members of the Bordeaux Royal Academy of Sciences met to consider sixteen essays written in response to the following question: ‘What is the physical cause of the Negro’s color, the quality of [the Negro’s] hair, and the degeneration of both [Negro hair and skin]?’

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Suture Shock: Humanity goes under the knife

Suture Shock: Humanity goes under the knife

As we become ever more remote from ‘meatspace’, it’s worth considering the role the scalpel and the needle may play in that development.

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Not the debate we need: On mitochondrial donation

Not the debate we need: On mitochondrial donation

If a society consisted of human beings who had been partly engineered or edited, would we think about human life in the same way or would we lose a sense of reciprocity with others?

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Review of Harlem Nights, by Deidre O’Connell

Review of Harlem Nights, by Deidre O’Connell

‘As sure as guns is guns, if we let in coloured labour, they’ll swallow us. They hate us. All the other colours hate the white. And they’re only waiting till we haven’t got the pull over them. They’re only waiting. And then what about poor little Australia?’

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It’s the stupidity, stupid! On technocratic populism

It’s the stupidity, stupid! On technocratic populism

Even as it grows more menacing in point of imagery and political polemic, the Australian iteration of the anti-lockdown/anti-vaccination movement (if indeed it is a movement) still has the air of cosplay about it.

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Identity Crisis: Radical Gender Theory and the Left

Identity Crisis: Radical Gender Theory and the Left

In his latest series of documentaries Can’t Get You Out of My Head (reviewed by Guy Rundle in Arena Quarterly No. 6), sociologist and filmmaker Adam Curtis focuses on a number of individuals who sit at the uneasy intersection of modern individualism, an increasingly technologised vision of the human mind and human behaviour, and a liberatory politics denuded of grand historical narratives.

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The Rome Zoo, by Pascal Janovjak

The Rome Zoo, by Pascal Janovjak

In his extraordinary novel The Rome Zoo, French author Pascal Janovjak uses the eponymous institution to observe one species in particular: not the imperious lions or the mischievous chimps or the pygmy hippopotami, all of which are there in the background, but the human beings that would remove those animals from their natural habitats and put them in cages.

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Review of Blood Lust, Trust and Blame

Review of Blood Lust, Trust and Blame

Though Monash University is named for a soldier, I’ve no doubt at all that this important offering from its In the National Interest series – Blood Lust, Trust and Blame, by Samantha Crompvoets – will be labelled by some as unpatriotic for raising a number of uncomfortable questions about the functioning of Australia’s military.

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